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Where Is My Father? Son Begs Chinese Government For Proof Of Life After Dad Placed In Concentration Camp

Every day Arfat Elkin lives the same nightmare: The Chinese Government has detained his father and he has no idea if his father is dead or alive.

“In 2017 I lost contact with my parents, Arfat said. “In 2018, a year later I learned my mom was in a concentration camp, and my father, he disappeared in March 2018.”  “I’ve contacted the Chinese government, sent letters to the Chinese embassy, the United Nations, every place I could contact. More than two years later I still don’t have information.”

Arfat came to the United States in 2015 as an international student to fulfill a dream to study economics.  He is from the northwestern region of Xinjiang, a mostly Muslim Turkic-speaking ethnic group.

Hid dad, Erkin Tursum, is a TV Producer and Journalist at Yili TV.  Arfat said his dad was detained by the government because he allowed his son to study abroad.

Arfat’s family is among the tens of thousands of families swept up in President Xi Jinping’s campaign to suppress the Uighur Muslim minority in Xinjiang, China.

The NY Post reports: 

It turns out the Chinese Communist Party is bent on permanently locking up much of the Uighur Muslim population of the far-west region of Xinjiang: Satellite images show that Beijing has secretly built 260 high-security concentration camps to hold them.

Many, perhaps all, include a factory in the camp so the prisoners can be forced to labor for the state, as well.

“People are living in horror in these ­places,” said Zhenishan Berdibek, 49, who was held in a camp for much of 2018. “Some of the younger people were not as tolerant as us — they cried and screamed and shouted.” “I lost my hope,” Berdibek told BuzzFeed. “I wanted to die inside the camp.”

Beijing has claimed that the Uighurs represent an Islamic terrorist threat, but the ugly reality is the CCP under President Xi Jinping is bent on crushing any possible resistance or dissent, religious or secular — and laughs at the idea of human rights.

 

Since 2017, the Chinese Community Party has detained between 1 million to 3 million Uighurs and other minority groups in mass concentration camps where they are forced to abandon their religion, study communist propaganda, and are accused of torturing Uighurs, including sexual abuse, forced labor, water boarding and forced sterilizations. Those not in the camps are believed to be under strict government surveillance.

President Donald Trump signed the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2020 that condemns China for its human rights abuses and mandates sanctions against those responsible for the abuse of China’s Muslim minority.